Commit bef98650 authored by Dmitry Torokhov's avatar Dmitry Torokhov
Browse files
parents 4bdbd280 c9976797
......@@ -20,6 +20,7 @@
# Top-level generic files
#
tags
TAGS
vmlinux*
System.map
Module.symvers
......
......@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ S: Longford, Ireland
S: Sydney, Australia
N: Tigran A. Aivazian
E: tigran@veritas.com
E: tigran@aivazian.fsnet.co.uk
W: http://www.moses.uklinux.net/patches
D: BFS filesystem
D: Intel IA32 CPU microcode update support
......@@ -2598,6 +2598,9 @@ S: Ucitelska 1576
S: Prague 8
S: 182 00 Czech Republic
N: Rick Payne
D: RFC2385 Support for TCP
N: Barak A. Pearlmutter
E: bap@cs.unm.edu
W: http://www.cs.unm.edu/~bap/
......@@ -3511,14 +3514,12 @@ D: The Linux Support Team Erlangen
N: David Weinehall
E: tao@acc.umu.se
P: 1024D/DC47CA16 7ACE 0FB0 7A74 F994 9B36 E1D1 D14E 8526 DC47 CA16
W: http://www.acc.umu.se/~tao/
W: http://www.acc.umu.se/~mcalinux/
D: v2.0 kernel maintainer
D: Fixes for the NE/2-driver
D: Miscellaneous MCA-support
D: Cleanup of the Config-files
S: Axtorpsvagen 40:20
S: S-903 37 UMEA
S: Sweden
N: Matt Welsh
E: mdw@metalab.unc.edu
......
......@@ -104,8 +104,6 @@ firmware_class/
- request_firmware() hotplug interface info.
floppy.txt
- notes and driver options for the floppy disk driver.
ftape.txt
- notes about the floppy tape device driver.
hayes-esp.txt
- info on using the Hayes ESP serial driver.
highuid.txt
......
......@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ udev
----
udev is a userspace application for populating /dev dynamically with
only entries for devices actually present. udev replaces the basic
functionality of devfs, while allowing persistant device naming for
functionality of devfs, while allowing persistent device naming for
devices.
FUSE
......
......@@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ To get this part of the dma_ API, you must #include <linux/dmapool.h>
Many drivers need lots of small dma-coherent memory regions for DMA
descriptors or I/O buffers. Rather than allocating in units of a page
or more using dma_alloc_coherent(), you can use DMA pools. These work
much like a kmem_cache_t, except that they use the dma-coherent allocator
much like a struct kmem_cache, except that they use the dma-coherent allocator
not __get_free_pages(). Also, they understand common hardware constraints
for alignment, like queue heads needing to be aligned on N byte boundaries.
......@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ The pool create() routines initialize a pool of dma-coherent buffers
for use with a given device. It must be called in a context which
can sleep.
The "name" is for diagnostics (like a kmem_cache_t name); dev and size
The "name" is for diagnostics (like a struct kmem_cache name); dev and size
are like what you'd pass to dma_alloc_coherent(). The device's hardware
alignment requirement for this type of data is "align" (which is expressed
in bytes, and must be a power of two). If your device has no boundary
......@@ -431,10 +431,10 @@ be identical to those passed in (and returned by
dma_alloc_noncoherent()).
int
dma_is_consistent(dma_addr_t dma_handle)
dma_is_consistent(struct device *dev, dma_addr_t dma_handle)
returns true if the memory pointed to by the dma_handle is actually
consistent.
returns true if the device dev is performing consistent DMA on the memory
area pointed to by the dma_handle.
int
dma_get_cache_alignment(void)
......@@ -459,7 +459,7 @@ anything like this. You must also be extra careful about accessing
memory you intend to sync partially.
void
dma_cache_sync(void *vaddr, size_t size,
dma_cache_sync(struct device *dev, void *vaddr, size_t size,
enum dma_data_direction direction)
Do a partial sync of memory that was allocated by
......@@ -489,7 +489,7 @@ size is the size of the area (must be multiples of PAGE_SIZE).
flags can be or'd together and are
DMA_MEMORY_MAP - request that the memory returned from
dma_alloc_coherent() be directly writeable.
dma_alloc_coherent() be directly writable.
DMA_MEMORY_IO - request that the memory returned from
dma_alloc_coherent() be addressable using read/write/memcpy_toio etc.
......
......@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ lock.
Once the DMA transfer is finished (or timed out) you should disable
the channel again. You should also check get_dma_residue() to make
sure that all data has been transfered.
sure that all data has been transferred.
Example:
......
......@@ -190,9 +190,13 @@ quiet_cmd_fig2png = FIG2PNG $@
###
# Help targets as used by the top-level makefile
dochelp:
@echo ' Linux kernel internal documentation in different formats:'
@echo ' xmldocs (XML DocBook), psdocs (Postscript), pdfdocs (PDF)'
@echo ' htmldocs (HTML), mandocs (man pages, use installmandocs to install)'
@echo ' Linux kernel internal documentation in different formats:'
@echo ' htmldocs - HTML'
@echo ' installmandocs - install man pages generated by mandocs'
@echo ' mandocs - man pages'
@echo ' pdfdocs - PDF'
@echo ' psdocs - Postscript'
@echo ' xmldocs - XML DocBook'
###
# Temporary files left by various tools
......
......@@ -418,9 +418,35 @@ X!Edrivers/pnp/system.c
!Idrivers/parport/daisy.c
</chapter>
<chapter id="viddev">
<title>Video4Linux</title>
!Edrivers/media/video/videodev.c
<chapter id="message_devices">
<title>Message-based devices</title>
<sect1><title>Fusion message devices</title>
!Edrivers/message/fusion/mptbase.c
!Idrivers/message/fusion/mptbase.c
!Edrivers/message/fusion/mptscsih.c
!Idrivers/message/fusion/mptscsih.c
!Idrivers/message/fusion/mptctl.c
!Idrivers/message/fusion/mptspi.c
!Idrivers/message/fusion/mptfc.c
!Idrivers/message/fusion/mptlan.c
</sect1>
<sect1><title>I2O message devices</title>
!Iinclude/linux/i2o.h
!Idrivers/message/i2o/core.h
!Edrivers/message/i2o/iop.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/iop.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/config-osm.c
!Edrivers/message/i2o/exec-osm.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/exec-osm.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/bus-osm.c
!Edrivers/message/i2o/device.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/device.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/driver.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/pci.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/i2o_block.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/i2o_scsi.c
!Idrivers/message/i2o/i2o_proc.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="snddev">
......
......@@ -345,8 +345,7 @@ static inline void skel_delete (struct usb_skel *dev)
usb_buffer_free (dev->udev, dev->bulk_out_size,
dev->bulk_out_buffer,
dev->write_urb->transfer_dma);
if (dev->write_urb != NULL)
usb_free_urb (dev->write_urb);
usb_free_urb (dev->write_urb);
kfree (dev);
}
</programlisting>
......
......@@ -365,6 +365,7 @@ You can change this at module load time (for a module) with:
regshifts=<shift1>,<shift2>,...
slave_addrs=<addr1>,<addr2>,...
force_kipmid=<enable1>,<enable2>,...
unload_when_empty=[0|1]
Each of these except si_trydefaults is a list, the first item for the
first interface, second item for the second interface, etc.
......@@ -416,6 +417,11 @@ by the driver, but systems with broken interrupts might need an enable,
or users that don't want the daemon (don't need the performance, don't
want the CPU hit) can disable it.
If unload_when_empty is set to 1, the driver will be unloaded if it
doesn't find any interfaces or all the interfaces fail to work. The
default is one. Setting to 0 is useful with the hotmod, but is
obviously only useful for modules.
When compiled into the kernel, the parameters can be specified on the
kernel command line as:
......@@ -441,6 +447,25 @@ have high-res timers enabled in the kernel and you don't have
interrupts enabled, the driver will run VERY slowly. Don't blame me,
these interfaces suck.
The driver supports a hot add and remove of interfaces. This way,
interfaces can be added or removed after the kernel is up and running.
This is done using /sys/modules/ipmi_si/hotmod, which is a write-only
parameter. You write a string to this interface. The string has the
format:
<op1>[:op2[:op3...]]
The "op"s are:
add|remove,kcs|bt|smic,mem|i/o,<address>[,<opt1>[,<opt2>[,...]]]
You can specify more than one interface on the line. The "opt"s are:
rsp=<regspacing>
rsi=<regsize>
rsh=<regshift>
irq=<irq>
ipmb=<ipmb slave addr>
and these have the same meanings as discussed above. Note that you
can also use this on the kernel command line for a more compact format
for specifying an interface. Note that when removing an interface,
only the first three parameters (si type, address type, and address)
are used for the comparison. Any options are ignored for removing.
The SMBus Driver
----------------
......@@ -502,7 +527,10 @@ used to control it:
modprobe ipmi_watchdog timeout=<t> pretimeout=<t> action=<action type>
preaction=<preaction type> preop=<preop type> start_now=x
nowayout=x
nowayout=x ifnum_to_use=n
ifnum_to_use specifies which interface the watchdog timer should use.
The default is -1, which means to pick the first one registered.
The timeout is the number of seconds to the action, and the pretimeout
is the amount of seconds before the reset that the pre-timeout panic will
......@@ -624,5 +652,9 @@ command line. The parameter is also available via the proc filesystem
in /proc/sys/dev/ipmi/poweroff_powercycle. Note that if the system
does not support power cycling, it will always do the power off.
The "ifnum_to_use" parameter specifies which interface the poweroff
code should use. The default is -1, which means to pick the first one
registered.
Note that if you have ACPI enabled, the system will prefer using ACPI to
power off.
......@@ -219,7 +219,7 @@ into the field vector of each element contained in a second argument.
Note that the pre-assigned IOAPIC dev->irq is valid only if the device
operates in PIN-IRQ assertion mode. In MSI-X mode, any attempt at
using dev->irq by the device driver to request for interrupt service
may result unpredictabe behavior.
may result in unpredictable behavior.
For each MSI-X vector granted, a device driver is responsible for calling
other functions like request_irq(), enable_irq(), etc. to enable
......
......@@ -96,9 +96,9 @@ a) TASKSTATS_TYPE_AGGR_PID/TGID : attribute containing no payload but indicates
a pid/tgid will be followed by some stats.
b) TASKSTATS_TYPE_PID/TGID: attribute whose payload is the pid/tgid whose stats
is being returned.
are being returned.
c) TASKSTATS_TYPE_STATS: attribute with a struct taskstsats as payload. The
c) TASKSTATS_TYPE_STATS: attribute with a struct taskstats as payload. The
same structure is used for both per-pid and per-tgid stats.
3. New message sent by kernel whenever a task exits. The payload consists of a
......@@ -122,12 +122,12 @@ of atomicity).
However, maintaining per-process, in addition to per-task stats, within the
kernel has space and time overheads. To address this, the taskstats code
accumalates each exiting task's statistics into a process-wide data structure.
When the last task of a process exits, the process level data accumalated also
accumulates each exiting task's statistics into a process-wide data structure.
When the last task of a process exits, the process level data accumulated also
gets sent to userspace (along with the per-task data).
When a user queries to get per-tgid data, the sum of all other live threads in
the group is added up and added to the accumalated total for previously exited
the group is added up and added to the accumulated total for previously exited
threads of the same thread group.
Extending taskstats
......
......@@ -24,8 +24,10 @@ very similar behavior to the deadline IO scheduler.
Selecting IO schedulers
-----------------------
To choose IO schedulers at boot time, use the argument 'elevator=deadline'.
'noop' and 'as' (the default) are also available. IO schedulers are assigned
globally at boot time only presently.
'noop', 'as' and 'cfq' (the default) are also available. IO schedulers are
assigned globally at boot time only presently. It's also possible to change
the IO scheduler for a determined device on the fly, as described in
Documentation/block/switching-sched.txt.
Anticipatory IO scheduler Policies
......
......@@ -183,7 +183,7 @@ it, the pci dma mapping routines and associated data structures have now been
modified to accomplish a direct page -> bus translation, without requiring
a virtual address mapping (unlike the earlier scheme of virtual address
-> bus translation). So this works uniformly for high-memory pages (which
do not have a correponding kernel virtual address space mapping) and
do not have a corresponding kernel virtual address space mapping) and
low-memory pages.
Note: Please refer to DMA-mapping.txt for a discussion on PCI high mem DMA
......@@ -391,7 +391,7 @@ forced such requests to be broken up into small chunks before being passed
on to the generic block layer, only to be merged by the i/o scheduler
when the underlying device was capable of handling the i/o in one shot.
Also, using the buffer head as an i/o structure for i/os that didn't originate
from the buffer cache unecessarily added to the weight of the descriptors
from the buffer cache unnecessarily added to the weight of the descriptors
which were generated for each such chunk.
The following were some of the goals and expectations considered in the
......@@ -403,14 +403,14 @@ i. Should be appropriate as a descriptor for both raw and buffered i/o -
for raw i/o.
ii. Ability to represent high-memory buffers (which do not have a virtual
address mapping in kernel address space).
iii.Ability to represent large i/os w/o unecessarily breaking them up (i.e
iii.Ability to represent large i/os w/o unnecessarily breaking them up (i.e
greater than PAGE_SIZE chunks in one shot)
iv. At the same time, ability to retain independent identity of i/os from
different sources or i/o units requiring individual completion (e.g. for
latency reasons)
v. Ability to represent an i/o involving multiple physical memory segments
(including non-page aligned page fragments, as specified via readv/writev)
without unecessarily breaking it up, if the underlying device is capable of
without unnecessarily breaking it up, if the underlying device is capable of
handling it.
vi. Preferably should be based on a memory descriptor structure that can be
passed around different types of subsystems or layers, maybe even
......@@ -1013,7 +1013,7 @@ Characteristics:
i. Binary tree
AS and deadline i/o schedulers use red black binary trees for disk position
sorting and searching, and a fifo linked list for time-based searching. This
gives good scalability and good availablility of information. Requests are
gives good scalability and good availability of information. Requests are
almost always dispatched in disk sort order, so a cache is kept of the next
request in sort order to prevent binary tree lookups.
......
The cpufreq-nforce2 driver changes the FSB on nVidia nForce2 plattforms.
The cpufreq-nforce2 driver changes the FSB on nVidia nForce2 platforms.
This works better than on other plattforms, because the FSB of the CPU
This works better than on other platforms, because the FSB of the CPU
can be controlled independently from the PCI/AGP clock.
The module has two options:
......
......@@ -54,8 +54,8 @@ additional_cpus=n (*) Use this to limit hotpluggable cpus. This option sets
ia64 and x86_64 use the number of disabled local apics in ACPI tables MADT
to determine the number of potentially hot-pluggable cpus. The implementation
should only rely on this to count the #of cpus, but *MUST* not rely on the
apicid values in those tables for disabled apics. In the event BIOS doesnt
should only rely on this to count the # of cpus, but *MUST* not rely on the
apicid values in those tables for disabled apics. In the event BIOS doesn't
mark such hot-pluggable cpus as disabled entries, one could use this
parameter "additional_cpus=x" to represent those cpus in the cpu_possible_map.
......
......@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
Maintained by Torben Mathiasen <device@lanana.org>
Last revised: 15 May 2006
Last revised: 29 November 2006
This list is the Linux Device List, the official registry of allocated
device numbers and /dev directory nodes for the Linux operating
......@@ -92,8 +92,9 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
7 = /dev/full Returns ENOSPC on write
8 = /dev/random Nondeterministic random number gen.
9 = /dev/urandom Faster, less secure random number gen.
10 = /dev/aio Asyncronous I/O notification interface
10 = /dev/aio Asynchronous I/O notification interface
11 = /dev/kmsg Writes to this come out as printk's
1 block RAM disk
0 = /dev/ram0 First RAM disk
1 = /dev/ram1 Second RAM disk
......@@ -122,7 +123,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
devices are on major 128 and above and use the PTY
master multiplex (/dev/ptmx) to acquire a PTY on
demand.
2 block Floppy disks
0 = /dev/fd0 Controller 0, drive 0, autodetect
1 = /dev/fd1 Controller 0, drive 1, autodetect
......@@ -257,7 +258,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
129 = /dev/vcsa1 tty1 text/attribute contents
...
191 = /dev/vcsa63 tty63 text/attribute contents
NOTE: These devices permit both read and write access.
7 block Loopback devices
......@@ -411,7 +412,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
207 = /dev/video/em8300_sp EM8300 DVD decoder subpicture
208 = /dev/compaq/cpqphpc Compaq PCI Hot Plug Controller
209 = /dev/compaq/cpqrid Compaq Remote Insight Driver
210 = /dev/impi/bt IMPI coprocessor block transfer
210 = /dev/impi/bt IMPI coprocessor block transfer
211 = /dev/impi/smic IMPI coprocessor stream interface
212 = /dev/watchdogs/0 First watchdog device
213 = /dev/watchdogs/1 Second watchdog device
......@@ -506,6 +507,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
33 = /dev/patmgr1 Sequencer patch manager
34 = /dev/midi02 Third MIDI port
50 = /dev/midi03 Fourth MIDI port
14 block BIOS harddrive callback support {2.6}
0 = /dev/dos_hda First BIOS harddrive whole disk
64 = /dev/dos_hdb Second BIOS harddrive whole disk
......@@ -527,6 +529,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
16 char Non-SCSI scanners
0 = /dev/gs4500 Genius 4500 handheld scanner
16 block GoldStar CD-ROM
0 = /dev/gscd GoldStar CD-ROM
......@@ -548,6 +551,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
0 = /dev/ttyC0 First Cyclades port
...
31 = /dev/ttyC31 32nd Cyclades port
19 block "Double" compressed disk
0 = /dev/double0 First compressed disk
...
......@@ -563,6 +567,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
0 = /dev/cub0 Callout device for ttyC0
...
31 = /dev/cub31 Callout device for ttyC31
20 block Hitachi CD-ROM (under development)
0 = /dev/hitcd Hitachi CD-ROM
......@@ -582,7 +587,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
This device is used on the ARM-based Acorn RiscPC.
Partitions are handled the same way as for IDE disks
(see major number 3).
(see major number 3).
22 char Digiboard serial card
0 = /dev/ttyD0 First Digiboard port
......@@ -591,7 +596,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
22 block Second IDE hard disk/CD-ROM interface
0 = /dev/hdc Master: whole disk (or CD-ROM)
64 = /dev/hdd Slave: whole disk (or CD-ROM)
Partitions are handled the same way as for the first
interface (see major number 3).
......@@ -639,6 +644,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
26 char Quanta WinVision frame grabber {2.6}
0 = /dev/wvisfgrab Quanta WinVision frame grabber
26 block Second Matsushita (Panasonic/SoundBlaster) CD-ROM
0 = /dev/sbpcd4 Panasonic CD-ROM controller 1 unit 0
1 = /dev/sbpcd5 Panasonic CD-ROM controller 1 unit 1
......@@ -670,6 +676,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
37 = /dev/nrawqft1 Unit 1, no rewind-on-close, no file marks
38 = /dev/nrawqft2 Unit 2, no rewind-on-close, no file marks
39 = /dev/nrawqft3 Unit 3, no rewind-on-close, no file marks
27 block Third Matsushita (Panasonic/SoundBlaster) CD-ROM
0 = /dev/sbpcd8 Panasonic CD-ROM controller 2 unit 0
1 = /dev/sbpcd9 Panasonic CD-ROM controller 2 unit 1
......@@ -681,6 +688,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
1 = /dev/staliomem1 Second Stallion card I/O memory
2 = /dev/staliomem2 Third Stallion card I/O memory
3 = /dev/staliomem3 Fourth Stallion card I/O memory
28 char Atari SLM ACSI laser printer (68k/Atari)
0 = /dev/slm0 First SLM laser printer
1 = /dev/slm1 Second SLM laser printer
......@@ -690,6 +698,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
1 = /dev/sbpcd13 Panasonic CD-ROM controller 3 unit 1
2 = /dev/sbpcd14 Panasonic CD-ROM controller 3 unit 2
3 = /dev/sbpcd15 Panasonic CD-ROM controller 3 unit 3
28 block ACSI disk (68k/Atari)
0 = /dev/ada First ACSI disk whole disk
16 = /dev/adb Second ACSI disk whole disk
......@@ -750,6 +759,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
31 char MPU-401 MIDI
0 = /dev/mpu401data MPU-401 data port
1 = /dev/mpu401stat MPU-401 status port
31 block ROM/flash memory card
0 = /dev/rom0 First ROM card (rw)
...
......@@ -801,7 +811,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
34 block Fourth IDE hard disk/CD-ROM interface
0 = /dev/hdg Master: whole disk (or CD-ROM)
64 = /dev/hdh Slave: whole disk (or CD-ROM)
Partitions are handled the same way as for the first
interface (see major number 3).
......@@ -818,6 +828,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
129 = /dev/smpte1 Second MIDI port, SMPTE timed
130 = /dev/smpte2 Third MIDI port, SMPTE timed
131 = /dev/smpte3 Fourth MIDI port, SMPTE timed
35 block Slow memory ramdisk
0 = /dev/slram Slow memory ramdisk
......@@ -828,6 +839,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
16 = /dev/tap0 First Ethertap device
...
31 = /dev/tap15 16th Ethertap device
36 block MCA ESDI hard disk
0 = /dev/eda First ESDI disk whole disk
64 = /dev/edb Second ESDI disk whole disk
......@@ -882,6 +894,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
40 char Matrox Meteor frame grabber {2.6}
0 = /dev/mmetfgrab Matrox Meteor frame grabber
40 block Syquest EZ135 parallel port removable drive
0 = /dev/eza Parallel EZ135 drive, whole disk
......@@ -893,6 +906,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
41 char Yet Another Micro Monitor
0 = /dev/yamm Yet Another Micro Monitor
41 block MicroSolutions BackPack parallel port CD-ROM
0 = /dev/bpcd BackPack CD-ROM
......@@ -901,6 +915,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
the parallel port ATAPI CD-ROM driver at major number 46.
42 char Demo/sample use
42 block Demo/sample use
This number is intended for use in sample code, as
......@@ -918,6 +933,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
0 = /dev/ttyI0 First virtual modem
...
63 = /dev/ttyI63 64th virtual modem
43 block Network block devices
0 = /dev/nb0 First network block device
1 = /dev/nb1 Second network block device
......@@ -934,12 +950,13 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
0 = /dev/cui0 Callout device for ttyI0
...
63 = /dev/cui63 Callout device for ttyI63
44 block Flash Translation Layer (FTL) filesystems
0 = /dev/ftla FTL on first Memory Technology Device
16 = /dev/ftlb FTL on second Memory Technology Device
32 = /dev/ftlc FTL on third Memory Technology Device
...
240 = /dev/ftlp FTL on 16th Memory Technology Device
240 = /dev/ftlp FTL on 16th Memory Technology Device
Partitions are handled in the same way as for IDE
disks (see major number 3) except that the partition
......@@ -958,6 +975,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
191 = /dev/ippp63 64th SyncPPP device
255 = /dev/isdninfo ISDN monitor interface
45 block Parallel port IDE disk devices
0 = /dev/pda First parallel port IDE disk
16 = /dev/pdb Second parallel port IDE disk
......@@ -1044,6 +1062,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
1 = /dev/dcbri1 Second DataComm card
2 = /dev/dcbri2 Third DataComm card
3 = /dev/dcbri3 Fourth DataComm card
52 block Mylex DAC960 PCI RAID controller; fifth controller
0 = /dev/rd/c4d0 First disk, whole disk
8 = /dev/rd/c4d1 Second disk, whole disk
......@@ -1093,7 +1112,8 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
55 char DSP56001 digital signal processor
0 = /dev/dsp56k First DSP56001
55 block Mylex DAC960 PCI RAID controller; eigth controller
55 block Mylex DAC960 PCI RAID controller; eighth controller
0 = /dev/rd/c7d0 First disk, whole disk
8 = /dev/rd/c7d1 Second disk, whole disk
...
......@@ -1130,6 +1150,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
0 = /dev/cup0 Callout device for ttyP0
1 = /dev/cup1 Callout device for ttyP1
...
58 block Reserved for logical volume manager
59 char sf firewall package
......@@ -1149,6 +1170,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
NAMING CONFLICT -- PROPOSED REVISED NAME /dev/rpda0 etc
60-63 char LOCAL/EXPERIMENTAL USE
60-63 block LOCAL/EXPERIMENTAL USE
Allocated for local/experimental use. For devices not
assigned official numbers, these ranges should be
......@@ -1434,7 +1456,6 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
DAC960 (see major number 48) except that the limit on
partitions is 15.
78 char PAM Software's multimodem boards
0 = /dev/ttyM0 First PAM modem
1 = /dev/ttyM1 Second PAM modem
......@@ -1450,13 +1471,12 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
DAC960 (see major number 48) except that the limit on
partitions is 15.
79 char PAM Software's multimodem boards - alternate devices
0 = /dev/cum0 Callout device for ttyM0
1 = /dev/cum1 Callout device for ttyM1
...
79 block Compaq Intelligent Drive Array, eigth controller
79 block Compaq Intelligent Drive Array, eighth controller
0 = /dev/ida/c7d0 First logical drive whole disk
16 = /dev/ida/c7d1 Second logical drive whole disk
...
......@@ -1466,7 +1486,6 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
DAC960 (see major number 48) except that the limit on
partitions is 15.
80 char Photometrics AT200 CCD camera
0 = /dev/at200 Photometrics AT200 CCD camera
......@@ -1679,7 +1698,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
1 = /dev/dcxx1 Second capture card
...
94 block IBM S/390 DASD block storage
94 block IBM S/390 DASD block storage
0 = /dev/dasda First DASD device, major
1 = /dev/dasda1 First DASD device, block 1
2 = /dev/dasda2 First DASD device, block 2
......@@ -1695,7 +1714,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
1 = /dev/ipnat NAT control device/log file
2 = /dev/ipstate State information log file
3 = /dev/ipauth Authentication control device/log file
...
...
96 char Parallel port ATAPI tape devices
0 = /dev/pt0 First parallel port ATAPI tape
......@@ -1705,7 +1724,7 @@ Your cooperation is appreciated.
129 = /dev/npt1 Second p.p. ATAPI tape, no rewind
...
96 block Inverse NAND Flash Translation Layer
96 block Inverse NAND Flash Translation Layer