1. 18 Jun, 2013 1 commit
  2. 28 Feb, 2013 1 commit
  3. 18 Nov, 2012 1 commit
  4. 01 Jul, 2012 1 commit
    • Neil Horman's avatar
      sctp: be more restrictive in transport selection on bundled sacks · 4244854d
      Neil Horman authored
      
      
      It was noticed recently that when we send data on a transport, its possible that
      we might bundle a sack that arrived on a different transport.  While this isn't
      a major problem, it does go against the SHOULD requirement in section 6.4 of RFC
      2960:
      
       An endpoint SHOULD transmit reply chunks (e.g., SACK, HEARTBEAT ACK,
         etc.) to the same destination transport address from which it
         received the DATA or control chunk to which it is replying.  This
         rule should also be followed if the endpoint is bundling DATA chunks
         together with the reply chunk.
      
      This patch seeks to correct that.  It restricts the bundling of sack operations
      to only those transports which have moved the ctsn of the association forward
      since the last sack.  By doing this we guarantee that we only bundle outbound
      saks on a transport that has received a chunk since the last sack.  This brings
      us into stricter compliance with the RFC.
      
      Vlad had initially suggested that we strictly allow only sack bundling on the
      transport that last moved the ctsn forward.  While this makes sense, I was
      concerned that doing so prevented us from bundling in the case where we had
      received chunks that moved the ctsn on multiple transports.  In those cases, the
      RFC allows us to select any of the transports having received chunks to bundle
      the sack on.  so I've modified the approach to allow for that, by adding a state
      variable to each transport that tracks weather it has moved the ctsn since the
      last sack.  This I think keeps our behavior (and performance), close enough to
      our current profile that I think we can do this without a sysctl knob to
      enable/disable it.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarNeil Horman <nhorman@tuxdriver.com>
      CC: Vlad Yaseivch <vyasevich@gmail.com>
      CC: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
      CC: linux-sctp@vger.kernel.org
      Reported-by: default avatarMichele Baldessari <michele@redhat.com>
      Reported-by: default avatarsorin serban <sserban@redhat.com>
      Acked-by: default avatarVlad Yasevich <vyasevich@gmail.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDavid S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
      4244854d
  5. 20 Feb, 2011 1 commit
  6. 30 Mar, 2010 1 commit
    • Tejun Heo's avatar
      include cleanup: Update gfp.h and slab.h includes to prepare for breaking... · 5a0e3ad6
      Tejun Heo authored
      include cleanup: Update gfp.h and slab.h includes to prepare for breaking implicit slab.h inclusion from percpu.h
      
      percpu.h is included by sched.h and module.h and thus ends up being
      included when building most .c files.  percpu.h includes slab.h which
      in turn includes gfp.h making everything defined by the two files
      universally available and complicating inclusion dependencies.
      
      percpu.h -> slab.h dependency is about to be removed.  Prepare for
      this change by updating users of gfp and slab facilities include those
      headers directly instead of assuming availability.  As this conversion
      needs to touch large number of source files, the following script is
      used as the basis of conversion.
      
        http://userweb.kernel.org/~tj/misc/slabh-sweep.py
      
      
      
      The script does the followings.
      
      * Scan files for gfp and slab usages and update includes such that
        only the necessary includes are there.  ie. if only gfp is used,
        gfp.h, if slab is used, slab.h.
      
      * When the script inserts a new include, it looks at the include
        blocks and try to put the new include such that its order conforms
        to its surrounding.  It's put in the include block which contains
        core kernel includes, in the same order that the rest are ordered -
        alphabetical, Christmas tree, rev-Xmas-tree or at the end if there
        doesn't seem to be any matching order.
      
      * If the script can't find a place to put a new include (mostly
        because the file doesn't have fitting include block), it prints out
        an error message indicating which .h file needs to be added to the
        file.
      
      The conversion was done in the following steps.
      
      1. The initial automatic conversion of all .c files updated slightly
         over 4000 files, deleting around 700 includes and adding ~480 gfp.h
         and ~3000 slab.h inclusions.  The script emitted errors for ~400
         files.
      
      2. Each error was manually checked.  Some didn't need the inclusion,
         some needed manual addition while adding it to implementation .h or
         embedding .c file was more appropriate for others.  This step added
         inclusions to around 150 files.
      
      3. The script was run again and the output was compared to the edits
         from #2 to make sure no file was left behind.
      
      4. Several build tests were done and a couple of problems were fixed.
         e.g. lib/decompress_*.c used malloc/free() wrappers around slab
         APIs requiring slab.h to be added manually.
      
      5. The script was run on all .h files but without automatically
         editing them as sprinkling gfp.h and slab.h inclusions around .h
         files could easily lead to inclusion dependency hell.  Most gfp.h
         inclusion directives were ignored as stuff from gfp.h was usually
         wildly available and often used in preprocessor macros.  Each
         slab.h inclusion directive was examined and added manually as
         necessary.
      
      6. percpu.h was updated not to include slab.h.
      
      7. Build test were done on the following configurations and failures
         were fixed.  CONFIG_GCOV_KERNEL was turned off for all tests (as my
         distributed build env didn't work with gcov compiles) and a few
         more options had to be turned off depending on archs to make things
         build (like ipr on powerpc/64 which failed due to missing writeq).
      
         * x86 and x86_64 UP and SMP allmodconfig and a custom test config.
         * powerpc and powerpc64 SMP allmodconfig
         * sparc and sparc64 SMP allmodconfig
         * ia64 SMP allmodconfig
         * s390 SMP allmodconfig
         * alpha SMP allmodconfig
         * um on x86_64 SMP allmodconfig
      
      8. percpu.h modifications were reverted so that it could be applied as
         a separate patch and serve as bisection point.
      
      Given the fact that I had only a couple of failures from tests on step
      6, I'm fairly confident about the coverage of this conversion patch.
      If there is a breakage, it's likely to be something in one of the arch
      headers which should be easily discoverable easily on most builds of
      the specific arch.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarTejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
      Guess-its-ok-by: default avatarChristoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org>
      Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
      Cc: Lee Schermerhorn <Lee.Schermerhorn@hp.com>
      5a0e3ad6
  7. 06 Jan, 2009 1 commit
  8. 08 Oct, 2008 2 commits
    • Vlad Yasevich's avatar
      sctp: shrink sctp_tsnmap some more by removing gabs array · 02015180
      Vlad Yasevich authored
      
      
      The gabs array in the sctp_tsnmap structure is only used
      in one place, sctp_make_sack().  As such, carrying the
      array around in the sctp_tsnmap and thus directly in
      the sctp_association is rather pointless since most
      of the time it's just taking up space.  Now, let
      sctp_make_sack create and populate it and then throw
      it away when it's done.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarVlad Yasevich <vladislav.yasevich@hp.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDavid S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
      02015180
    • Vlad Yasevich's avatar
      sctp: Rework the tsn map to use generic bitmap. · 8e1ee18c
      Vlad Yasevich authored
      
      
      The tsn map currently use is 4K large and is stuck inside
      the sctp_association structure making memory references REALLY
      expensive.  What we really need is at most 4K worth of bits
      so the biggest map we would have is 512 bytes.   Also, the
      map is only really usefull when we have gaps to store and
      report.  As such, starting with minimal map of say 32 TSNs (bits)
      should be enough for normal low-loss operations.  We can grow
      the map by some multiple of 32 along with some extra room any
      time we receive the TSN which would put us outside of the map
      boundry.  As we close gaps, we can shift the map to rebase
      it on the latest TSN we've seen.  This saves 4088 bytes per
      association just in the map alone along savings from the now
      unnecessary structure members.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarVlad Yasevich <vladislav.yasevich@hp.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDavid S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
      8e1ee18c
  9. 05 Feb, 2008 1 commit
  10. 01 Aug, 2007 1 commit
  11. 11 Feb, 2007 1 commit
  12. 03 Dec, 2006 1 commit
  13. 16 Apr, 2005 1 commit
    • Linus Torvalds's avatar
      Linux-2.6.12-rc2 · 1da177e4
      Linus Torvalds authored
      Initial git repository build. I'm not bothering with the full history,
      even though we have it. We can create a separate "historical" git
      archive of that later if we want to, and in the meantime it's about
      3.2GB when imported into git - space that would just make the early
      git days unnecessarily complicated, when we don't have a lot of good
      infrastructure for it.
      
      Let it rip!
      1da177e4