Commit 7eb19553 authored by Mike Travis's avatar Mike Travis Committed by Ingo Molnar
Browse files

Merge branch 'master' of...

Merge branch 'master' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/rusty/linux-2.6-cpumask

 into merge-rr-cpumask

Conflicts:
	arch/x86/kernel/io_apic.c
	kernel/rcuclassic.c
	kernel/sched.c
	kernel/time/tick-sched.c
Signed-off-by: default avatarMike Travis <travis@sgi.com>
[ mingo@elte.hu: backmerged typo fix for io_apic.c ]
Signed-off-by: default avatarIngo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
parents 6092848a 8c384cde
......@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
# To add a new book the only step required is to add the book to the
# list of DOCBOOKS.
DOCBOOKS := wanbook.xml z8530book.xml mcabook.xml \
DOCBOOKS := z8530book.xml mcabook.xml \
kernel-hacking.xml kernel-locking.xml deviceiobook.xml \
procfs-guide.xml writing_usb_driver.xml networking.xml \
kernel-api.xml filesystems.xml lsm.xml usb.xml kgdb.xml \
......
......@@ -98,9 +98,6 @@
X!Enet/core/wireless.c
</sect1>
-->
<sect1><title>Synchronous PPP</title>
!Edrivers/net/wan/syncppp.c
</sect1>
</chapter>
</book>
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.1.2//EN"
"http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.1.2/docbookx.dtd" []>
<book id="WANGuide">
<bookinfo>
<title>Synchronous PPP and Cisco HDLC Programming Guide</title>
<authorgroup>
<author>
<firstname>Alan</firstname>
<surname>Cox</surname>
<affiliation>
<address>
<email>alan@lxorguk.ukuu.org.uk</email>
</address>
</affiliation>
</author>
</authorgroup>
<copyright>
<year>2000</year>
<holder>Alan Cox</holder>
</copyright>
<legalnotice>
<para>
This documentation is free software; you can redistribute
it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public
License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later
version.
</para>
<para>
This program is distributed in the hope that it will be
useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied
warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
See the GNU General Public License for more details.
</para>
<para>
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public
License along with this program; if not, write to the Free
Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston,
MA 02111-1307 USA
</para>
<para>
For more details see the file COPYING in the source
distribution of Linux.
</para>
</legalnotice>
</bookinfo>
<toc></toc>
<chapter id="intro">
<title>Introduction</title>
<para>
The syncppp drivers in Linux provide a fairly complete
implementation of Cisco HDLC and a minimal implementation of
PPP. The longer term goal is to switch the PPP layer to the
generic PPP interface that is new in Linux 2.3.x. The API should
remain unchanged when this is done, but support will then be
available for IPX, compression and other PPP features
</para>
</chapter>
<chapter id="bugs">
<title>Known Bugs And Assumptions</title>
<para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry><term>PPP is minimal</term>
<listitem>
<para>
The current PPP implementation is very basic, although sufficient
for most wan usages.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
<varlistentry><term>Cisco HDLC Quirks</term>
<listitem>
<para>
Currently we do not end all packets with the correct Cisco multicast
or unicast flags. Nothing appears to mind too much but this should
be corrected.
</para>
</listitem></varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</para>
</chapter>
<chapter id="pubfunctions">
<title>Public Functions Provided</title>
!Edrivers/net/wan/syncppp.c
</chapter>
</book>
......@@ -16,6 +16,8 @@ RTFP.txt
- List of RCU papers (bibliography) going back to 1980.
torture.txt
- RCU Torture Test Operation (CONFIG_RCU_TORTURE_TEST)
trace.txt
- CONFIG_RCU_TRACE debugfs files and formats
UP.txt
- RCU on Uniprocessor Systems
whatisRCU.txt
......
Using hlist_nulls to protect read-mostly linked lists and
objects using SLAB_DESTROY_BY_RCU allocations.
Please read the basics in Documentation/RCU/listRCU.txt
Using special makers (called 'nulls') is a convenient way
to solve following problem :
A typical RCU linked list managing objects which are
allocated with SLAB_DESTROY_BY_RCU kmem_cache can
use following algos :
1) Lookup algo
--------------
rcu_read_lock()
begin:
obj = lockless_lookup(key);
if (obj) {
if (!try_get_ref(obj)) // might fail for free objects
goto begin;
/*
* Because a writer could delete object, and a writer could
* reuse these object before the RCU grace period, we
* must check key after geting the reference on object
*/
if (obj->key != key) { // not the object we expected
put_ref(obj);
goto begin;
}
}
rcu_read_unlock();
Beware that lockless_lookup(key) cannot use traditional hlist_for_each_entry_rcu()
but a version with an additional memory barrier (smp_rmb())
lockless_lookup(key)
{
struct hlist_node *node, *next;
for (pos = rcu_dereference((head)->first);
pos && ({ next = pos->next; smp_rmb(); prefetch(next); 1; }) &&
({ tpos = hlist_entry(pos, typeof(*tpos), member); 1; });
pos = rcu_dereference(next))
if (obj->key == key)
return obj;
return NULL;
And note the traditional hlist_for_each_entry_rcu() misses this smp_rmb() :
struct hlist_node *node;
for (pos = rcu_dereference((head)->first);
pos && ({ prefetch(pos->next); 1; }) &&
({ tpos = hlist_entry(pos, typeof(*tpos), member); 1; });
pos = rcu_dereference(pos->next))
if (obj->key == key)
return obj;
return NULL;
}
Quoting Corey Minyard :
"If the object is moved from one list to another list in-between the
time the hash is calculated and the next field is accessed, and the
object has moved to the end of a new list, the traversal will not
complete properly on the list it should have, since the object will
be on the end of the new list and there's not a way to tell it's on a
new list and restart the list traversal. I think that this can be
solved by pre-fetching the "next" field (with proper barriers) before
checking the key."
2) Insert algo :
----------------
We need to make sure a reader cannot read the new 'obj->obj_next' value
and previous value of 'obj->key'. Or else, an item could be deleted
from a chain, and inserted into another chain. If new chain was empty
before the move, 'next' pointer is NULL, and lockless reader can
not detect it missed following items in original chain.
/*
* Please note that new inserts are done at the head of list,
* not in the middle or end.
*/
obj = kmem_cache_alloc(...);
lock_chain(); // typically a spin_lock()
obj->key = key;
atomic_inc(&obj->refcnt);
/*
* we need to make sure obj->key is updated before obj->next
*/
smp_wmb();
hlist_add_head_rcu(&obj->obj_node, list);
unlock_chain(); // typically a spin_unlock()
3) Remove algo
--------------
Nothing special here, we can use a standard RCU hlist deletion.
But thanks to SLAB_DESTROY_BY_RCU, beware a deleted object can be reused
very very fast (before the end of RCU grace period)
if (put_last_reference_on(obj) {
lock_chain(); // typically a spin_lock()
hlist_del_init_rcu(&obj->obj_node);
unlock_chain(); // typically a spin_unlock()
kmem_cache_free(cachep, obj);
}
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
With hlist_nulls we can avoid extra smp_rmb() in lockless_lookup()
and extra smp_wmb() in insert function.
For example, if we choose to store the slot number as the 'nulls'
end-of-list marker for each slot of the hash table, we can detect
a race (some writer did a delete and/or a move of an object
to another chain) checking the final 'nulls' value if
the lookup met the end of chain. If final 'nulls' value
is not the slot number, then we must restart the lookup at
the begining. If the object was moved to same chain,
then the reader doesnt care : It might eventually
scan the list again without harm.
1) lookup algo
head = &table[slot];
rcu_read_lock();
begin:
hlist_nulls_for_each_entry_rcu(obj, node, head, member) {
if (obj->key == key) {
if (!try_get_ref(obj)) // might fail for free objects
goto begin;
if (obj->key != key) { // not the object we expected
put_ref(obj);
goto begin;
}
goto out;
}
/*
* if the nulls value we got at the end of this lookup is
* not the expected one, we must restart lookup.
* We probably met an item that was moved to another chain.
*/
if (get_nulls_value(node) != slot)
goto begin;
obj = NULL;
out:
rcu_read_unlock();
2) Insert function :
--------------------
/*
* Please note that new inserts are done at the head of list,
* not in the middle or end.
*/
obj = kmem_cache_alloc(cachep);
lock_chain(); // typically a spin_lock()
obj->key = key;
atomic_set(&obj->refcnt, 1);
/*
* insert obj in RCU way (readers might be traversing chain)
*/
hlist_nulls_add_head_rcu(&obj->obj_node, list);
unlock_chain(); // typically a spin_unlock()
CONFIG_RCU_TRACE debugfs Files and Formats
The rcupreempt and rcutree implementations of RCU provide debugfs trace
output that summarizes counters and state. This information is useful for
debugging RCU itself, and can sometimes also help to debug abuses of RCU.
Note that the rcuclassic implementation of RCU does not provide debugfs
trace output.
The following sections describe the debugfs files and formats for
preemptable RCU (rcupreempt) and hierarchical RCU (rcutree).
Preemptable RCU debugfs Files and Formats
This implementation of RCU provides three debugfs files under the
top-level directory RCU: rcu/rcuctrs (which displays the per-CPU
counters used by preemptable RCU) rcu/rcugp (which displays grace-period
counters), and rcu/rcustats (which internal counters for debugging RCU).
The output of "cat rcu/rcuctrs" looks as follows:
CPU last cur F M
0 5 -5 0 0
1 -1 0 0 0
2 0 1 0 0
3 0 1 0 0
4 0 1 0 0
5 0 1 0 0
6 0 2 0 0
7 0 -1 0 0
8 0 1 0 0
ggp = 26226, state = waitzero
The per-CPU fields are as follows:
o "CPU" gives the CPU number. Offline CPUs are not displayed.
o "last" gives the value of the counter that is being decremented
for the current grace period phase. In the example above,
the counters sum to 4, indicating that there are still four
RCU read-side critical sections still running that started
before the last counter flip.
o "cur" gives the value of the counter that is currently being
both incremented (by rcu_read_lock()) and decremented (by
rcu_read_unlock()). In the example above, the counters sum to
1, indicating that there is only one RCU read-side critical section
still running that started after the last counter flip.
o "F" indicates whether RCU is waiting for this CPU to acknowledge
a counter flip. In the above example, RCU is not waiting on any,
which is consistent with the state being "waitzero" rather than
"waitack".
o "M" indicates whether RCU is waiting for this CPU to execute a
memory barrier. In the above example, RCU is not waiting on any,
which is consistent with the state being "waitzero" rather than
"waitmb".
o "ggp" is the global grace-period counter.
o "state" is the RCU state, which can be one of the following:
o "idle": there is no grace period in progress.
o "waitack": RCU just incremented the global grace-period
counter, which has the effect of reversing the roles of
the "last" and "cur" counters above, and is waiting for
all the CPUs to acknowledge the flip. Once the flip has
been acknowledged, CPUs will no longer be incrementing
what are now the "last" counters, so that their sum will
decrease monotonically down to zero.
o "waitzero": RCU is waiting for the sum of the "last" counters
to decrease to zero.
o "waitmb": RCU is waiting for each CPU to execute a memory
barrier, which ensures that instructions from a given CPU's
last RCU read-side critical section cannot be reordered
with instructions following the memory-barrier instruction.
The output of "cat rcu/rcugp" looks as follows:
oldggp=48870 newggp=48873
Note that reading from this file provokes a synchronize_rcu(). The
"oldggp" value is that of "ggp" from rcu/rcuctrs above, taken before
executing the synchronize_rcu(), and the "newggp" value is also the
"ggp" value, but taken after the synchronize_rcu() command returns.
The output of "cat rcu/rcugp" looks as follows:
na=1337955 nl=40 wa=1337915 wl=44 da=1337871 dl=0 dr=1337871 di=1337871
1=50989 e1=6138 i1=49722 ie1=82 g1=49640 a1=315203 ae1=265563 a2=49640
z1=1401244 ze1=1351605 z2=49639 m1=5661253 me1=5611614 m2=49639
These are counters tracking internal preemptable-RCU events, however,
some of them may be useful for debugging algorithms using RCU. In
particular, the "nl", "wl", and "dl" values track the number of RCU
callbacks in various states. The fields are as follows:
o "na" is the total number of RCU callbacks that have been enqueued
since boot.
o "nl" is the number of RCU callbacks waiting for the previous
grace period to end so that they can start waiting on the next
grace period.
o "wa" is the total number of RCU callbacks that have started waiting
for a grace period since boot. "na" should be roughly equal to
"nl" plus "wa".
o "wl" is the number of RCU callbacks currently waiting for their
grace period to end.
o "da" is the total number of RCU callbacks whose grace periods
have completed since boot. "wa" should be roughly equal to
"wl" plus "da".
o "dr" is the total number of RCU callbacks that have been removed
from the list of callbacks ready to invoke. "dr" should be roughly
equal to "da".
o "di" is the total number of RCU callbacks that have been invoked
since boot. "di" should be roughly equal to "da", though some
early versions of preemptable RCU had a bug so that only the
last CPU's count of invocations was displayed, rather than the
sum of all CPU's counts.
o "1" is the number of calls to rcu_try_flip(). This should be
roughly equal to the sum of "e1", "i1", "a1", "z1", and "m1"
described below. In other words, the number of times that
the state machine is visited should be equal to the sum of the
number of times that each state is visited plus the number of
times that the state-machine lock acquisition failed.
o "e1" is the number of times that rcu_try_flip() was unable to
acquire the fliplock.
o "i1" is the number of calls to rcu_try_flip_idle().
o "ie1" is the number of times rcu_try_flip_idle() exited early
due to the calling CPU having no work for RCU.
o "g1" is the number of times that rcu_try_flip_idle() decided
to start a new grace period. "i1" should be roughly equal to
"ie1" plus "g1".
o "a1" is the number of calls to rcu_try_flip_waitack().
o "ae1" is the number of times that rcu_try_flip_waitack() found
that at least one CPU had not yet acknowledge the new grace period
(AKA "counter flip").
o "a2" is the number of time rcu_try_flip_waitack() found that
all CPUs had acknowledged. "a1" should be roughly equal to
"ae1" plus "a2". (This particular output was collected on
a 128-CPU machine, hence the smaller-than-usual fraction of
calls to rcu_try_flip_waitack() finding all CPUs having already
acknowledged.)
o "z1" is the number of calls to rcu_try_flip_waitzero().
o "ze1" is the number of times that rcu_try_flip_waitzero() found
that not all of the old RCU read-side critical sections had
completed.
o "z2" is the number of times that rcu_try_flip_waitzero() finds
the sum of the counters equal to zero, in other words, that
all of the old RCU read-side critical sections had completed.
The value of "z1" should be roughly equal to "ze1" plus
"z2".
o "m1" is the number of calls to rcu_try_flip_waitmb().
o "me1" is the number of times that rcu_try_flip_waitmb() finds
that at least one CPU has not yet executed a memory barrier.
o "m2" is the number of times that rcu_try_flip_waitmb() finds that
all CPUs have executed a memory barrier.
Hierarchical RCU debugfs Files and Formats
This implementation of RCU provides three debugfs files under the
top-level directory RCU: rcu/rcudata (which displays fields in struct
rcu_data), rcu/rcugp (which displays grace-period counters), and
rcu/rcuhier (which displays the struct rcu_node hierarchy).
The output of "cat rcu/rcudata" looks as follows:
rcu:
0 c=4011 g=4012 pq=1 pqc=4011 qp=0 rpfq=1 rp=3c2a dt=23301/73 dn=2 df=1882 of=0 ri=2126 ql=2 b=10
1 c=4011 g=4012 pq=1 pqc=4011 qp=0 rpfq=3 rp=39a6 dt=78073/1 dn=2 df=1402 of=0 ri=1875 ql=46 b=10
2 c=4010 g=4010 pq=1 pqc=4010 qp=0 rpfq=-5 rp=1d12 dt=16646/0 dn=2 df=3140 of=0 ri=2080 ql=0 b=10
3 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=2b50 dt=21159/1 dn=2 df=2230 of=0 ri=1923 ql=72 b=10
4 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1644 dt=5783/1 dn=2 df=3348 of=0 ri=2805 ql=7 b=10
5 c=4012 g=4013 pq=0 pqc=4011 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1aac dt=5879/1 dn=2 df=3140 of=0 ri=2066 ql=10 b=10
6 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=ed8 dt=5847/1 dn=2 df=3797 of=0 ri=1266 ql=10 b=10
7 c=4012 g=4013 pq=1 pqc=4012 qp=1 rpfq=3 rp=1fa2 dt=6199/1 dn=2 df=2795 of=0 ri=2162 ql=28 b=10
rcu_bh:
0 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=0 rpfq=-145 rp=21d6 dt=23301/73 dn=2 df=0 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
1 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-170 rp=20ce dt=78073/1 dn=2 df=26 of=0 ri=5 ql=0 b=10
2 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-83 rp=fbd dt=16646/0 dn=2 df=28 of=0 ri=4 ql=0 b=10
3 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=0 rpfq=-105 rp=178c dt=21159/1 dn=2 df=28 of=0 ri=2 ql=0 b=10
4 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-30 rp=b54 dt=5783/1 dn=2 df=32 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
5 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-29 rp=df5 dt=5879/1 dn=2 df=30 of=0 ri=3 ql=0 b=10
6 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-28 rp=788 dt=5847/1 dn=2 df=32 of=0 ri=0 ql=0 b=10
7 c=-268 g=-268 pq=1 pqc=-268 qp=1 rpfq=-53 rp=1098 dt=6199/1 dn=2 df=30 of=0 ri=3 ql=0 b=10
The first section lists the rcu_data structures for rcu, the second for
rcu_bh. Each section has one line per CPU, or eight for this 8-CPU system.
The fields are as follows:
o The number at the beginning of each line is the CPU number.
CPUs numbers followed by an exclamation mark are offline,
but have been online at least once since boot. There will be
no output for CPUs that have never been online, which can be
a good thing in the surprisingly common case where NR_CPUS is
substantially larger than the number of actual CPUs.
o "c" is the count of grace periods that this CPU believes have
completed. CPUs in dynticks idle mode may lag quite a ways
behind, for example, CPU 4 under "rcu" above, which has slept
through the past 25 RCU grace periods. It is not unusual to
see CPUs lagging by thousands of grace periods.
o "g" is the count of grace periods that this CPU believes have
started. Again, CPUs in dynticks idle mode may lag behind.
If the "c" and "g" values are equal, this CPU has already
reported a quiescent state for the last RCU grace period that
it is aware of, otherwise, the CPU believes that it owes RCU a
quiescent state.
o "pq" indicates that this CPU has passed through a quiescent state
for the current grace period. It is possible for "pq" to be
"1" and "c" different than "g", which indicates that although
the CPU has passed through a quiescent state, either (1) this
CPU has not yet reported that fact, (2) some other CPU has not
yet reported for this grace period, or (3) both.
o "pqc" indicates which grace period the last-observed quiescent
state for this CPU corresponds to. This is important for handling
the race between CPU 0 reporting an extended dynticks-idle
quiescent state for CPU 1 and CPU 1 suddenly waking up and
reporting its own quiescent state. If CPU 1 was the last CPU
for the current grace period, then the CPU that loses this race
will attempt to incorrectly mark CPU 1 as having checked in for
the next grace period!
o "qp" indicates that RCU still expects a quiescent state from
this CPU.
o "rpfq" is the number of rcu_pending() calls on this CPU required
to induce this CPU to invoke force_quiescent_state().
o "rp" is low-order four hex digits of the count of how many times
rcu_pending() has been invoked on this CPU.
o "dt" is the current value of the dyntick counter that is incremented
when entering or leaving dynticks idle state, either by the
scheduler or by irq. The number after the "/" is the interrupt
nesting depth when in dyntick-idle state, or one greater than
the interrupt-nesting depth otherwise.
This field is displayed only for CONFIG_NO_HZ kernels.
o "dn" is the current value of the dyntick counter that is incremented
when entering or leaving dynticks idle state via NMI. If both
the "dt" and "dn" values are even, then this CPU is in dynticks
idle mode and may be ignored by RCU. If either of these two
counters is odd, then RCU must be alert to the possibility of
an RCU read-side critical section running on this CPU.
This field is displayed only for CONFIG_NO_HZ kernels.
o "df" is the number of times that some other CPU has forced a
quiescent state on behalf of this CPU due to this CPU being in
dynticks-idle state.
This field is displayed only for CONFIG_NO_HZ kernels.
o "of" is the number of times that some other CPU has forced a
quiescent state on behalf of this CPU due to this CPU being
offline. In a perfect world, this might neve happen, but it
turns out that offlining and onlining a CPU can take several grace
periods, and so there is likely to be an extended period of time
when RCU believes that the CPU is online when it really is not.
Please note that erring in the other direction (RCU believing a
CPU is offline when it is really alive and kicking) is a fatal
error, so it makes sense to err conservatively.
o "ri" is the number of times that RCU has seen fit to send a
reschedule IPI to this CPU in order to get it to report a
quiescent state.
o "ql" is the number of RCU callbacks currently residing on
this CPU. This is the total number of callbacks, regardless
of what state they are in (new, waiting for grace period to
start, waiting for grace period to end, ready to invoke).
o "b" is the batch limit for this CPU. If more than this number
of RCU callbacks is ready to invoke, then the remainder will
be deferred.
The output of "cat rcu/rcugp" looks as follows:
rcu: completed=33062 gpnum=33063
rcu_bh: completed=464 gpnum=464
Again, this output is for both "rcu" and "rcu_bh". The fields are
taken from the rcu_state structure, and are as follows:
o "completed" is the number of grace periods that have completed.
It is comparable to the "c" field from rcu/rcudata in that a
CPU whose "c" field matches the value of "completed" is aware
that the corresponding RCU grace period has completed.
o "gpnum" is the number of grace periods that have started. It is
comparable to the "g" field from rcu/rcudata in that a CPU
whose "g" field matches the value of "gpnum" is aware that the
corresponding RCU grace period has started.
If these two fields are equal (as they are for "rcu_bh" above),
then there is no grace period in progress, in other words, RCU
is idle. On the other hand, if the two fields differ (as they
do for "rcu" above), then an RCU grace period is in progress.
The output of "cat rcu/rcuhier" looks as follows, with very long lines:
c=6902 g=6903 s=2 jfq=3 j=72c7 nfqs=13142/nfqsng=0(13142) fqlh=6
1/1 0:127 ^0
3/3 0:35 ^0 0/0 36:71 ^1 0/0 72:107 ^2 0/0 108:127 ^3
3/3f 0:5 ^0 2/3 6:11 ^1 0/0 12:17 ^2 0/0 18:23 ^3 0/0 24:29 ^4 0/0 30:35 ^5 0/0 36:41 ^0 0/0 42:47 ^1 0/0 48:53 ^2 0/0 54:59 ^3 0/0 60:65 ^4 0/0 66:71 ^5 0/0 72:77 ^0 0/0 78:83 ^1 0/0 84:89 ^2 0/0 90:95 ^3 0/0 96:101 ^4 0/0 102:107 ^5 0/0 108:113 ^0 0/0 114:119 ^1 0/0 120:125 ^2 0/0 126:127 ^3
rcu_bh:
c=-226 g=-226 s=1 jfq=-5701 j=72c7 nfqs=88/nfqsng=0(88) fqlh=0
0/1 0:127 ^0
0/3 0:35 ^0 0/0 36:71 ^1 0/0 72:107 ^2 0/0 108:127 ^3
0/3f 0:5 ^0 0/3 6:11 ^1 0/0 12:17 ^2 0/0 18:23 ^3 0/0 24:29 ^4 0/0 30:35 ^5 0/0 36:41 ^0 0/0 42:47 ^1 0/0 48:53 ^2 0/0 54:59 ^3 0/0 60:65 ^4 0/0 66:71 ^5 0/0 72:77 ^0 0/0 78:83 ^1 0/0 84:89 ^2 0/0 90:95 ^3 0/0 96:101 ^4 0/0 102:107 ^5 0/0 108:113 ^0 0/0 114:119 ^1 0/0 120:125 ^2 0/0 126:127 ^3
This is once again split into "rcu" and "rcu_bh" portions. The fields are