1. 30 Jun, 2006 1 commit
  2. 29 Jun, 2006 9 commits
  3. 28 Jun, 2006 1 commit
    • KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki's avatar
      [PATCH] node hotplug: register cpu: remove node struct · 76b67ed9
      KAMEZAWA Hiroyuki authored
      
      
      With Goto-san's patch, we can add new pgdat/node at runtime.  I'm now
      considering node-hot-add with cpu + memory on ACPI.
      
      I found acpi container, which describes node, could evaluate cpu before
      memory. This means cpu-hot-add occurs before memory hot add.
      
      In most part, cpu-hot-add doesn't depend on node hot add.  But register_cpu(),
      which creates symbolic link from node to cpu, requires that node should be
      onlined before register_cpu().  When a node is onlined, its pgdat should be
      there.
      
      This patch-set holds off creating symbolic link from node to cpu
      until node is onlined.
      
      This removes node arguments from register_cpu().
      
      Now, register_cpu() requires 'struct node' as its argument.  But the array of
      struct node is now unified in driver/base/node.c now (By Goto's node hotplug
      patch).  We can get struct node in generic way.  So, this argument is not
      necessary now.
      
      This patch also guarantees add cpu under node only when node is onlined.  It
      is necessary for node-hot-add vs.  cpu-hot-add patch following this.
      
      Moreover, register_cpu calculates cpu->node_id by cpu_to_node() without regard
      to its 'struct node *root' argument.  This patch removes it.
      
      Also modify callers of register_cpu()/unregister_cpu, whose args are changed
      by register-cpu-remove-node-struct patch.
      
      [Brice.Goglin@ens-lyon.org: fix it]
      Signed-off-by: default avatarKAMEZAWA Hiroyuki <kamezawa.hiroyu@jp.fujitsu.com>
      Cc: Yasunori Goto <y-goto@jp.fujitsu.com>
      Cc: Ashok Raj <ashok.raj@intel.com>
      Cc: Dave Hansen <haveblue@us.ibm.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarBrice Goglin <Brice.Goglin@ens-lyon.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      76b67ed9
  4. 26 Jun, 2006 2 commits
  5. 25 Jun, 2006 1 commit
  6. 25 May, 2006 1 commit
  7. 21 May, 2006 1 commit
  8. 15 May, 2006 2 commits
  9. 02 May, 2006 1 commit
  10. 01 May, 2006 1 commit
  11. 28 Apr, 2006 3 commits
  12. 31 Mar, 2006 1 commit
  13. 27 Mar, 2006 1 commit
    • Alan Stern's avatar
      [PATCH] Notifier chain update: API changes · e041c683
      Alan Stern authored
      The kernel's implementation of notifier chains is unsafe.  There is no
      protection against entries being added to or removed from a chain while the
      chain is in use.  The issues were discussed in this thread:
      
          http://marc.theaimsgroup.com/?l=linux-kernel&m=113018709002036&w=2
      
      
      
      We noticed that notifier chains in the kernel fall into two basic usage
      classes:
      
      	"Blocking" chains are always called from a process context
      	and the callout routines are allowed to sleep;
      
      	"Atomic" chains can be called from an atomic context and
      	the callout routines are not allowed to sleep.
      
      We decided to codify this distinction and make it part of the API.  Therefore
      this set of patches introduces three new, parallel APIs: one for blocking
      notifiers, one for atomic notifiers, and one for "raw" notifiers (which is
      really just the old API under a new name).  New kinds of data structures are
      used for the heads of the chains, and new routines are defined for
      registration, unregistration, and calling a chain.  The three APIs are
      explained in include/linux/notifier.h and their implementation is in
      kernel/sys.c.
      
      With atomic and blocking chains, the implementation guarantees that the chain
      links will not be corrupted and that chain callers will not get messed up by
      entries being added or removed.  For raw chains the implementation provides no
      guarantees at all; users of this API must provide their own protections.  (The
      idea was that situations may come up where the assumptions of the atomic and
      blocking APIs are not appropriate, so it should be possible for users to
      handle these things in their own way.)
      
      There are some limitations, which should not be too hard to live with.  For
      atomic/blocking chains, registration and unregistration must always be done in
      a process context since the chain is protected by a mutex/rwsem.  Also, a
      callout routine for a non-raw chain must not try to register or unregister
      entries on its own chain.  (This did happen in a couple of places and the code
      had to be changed to avoid it.)
      
      Since atomic chains may be called from within an NMI handler, they cannot use
      spinlocks for synchronization.  Instead we use RCU.  The overhead falls almost
      entirely in the unregister routine, which is okay since unregistration is much
      less frequent that calling a chain.
      
      Here is the list of chains that we adjusted and their classifications.  None
      of them use the raw API, so for the moment it is only a placeholder.
      
        ATOMIC CHAINS
        -------------
      arch/i386/kernel/traps.c:		i386die_chain
      arch/ia64/kernel/traps.c:		ia64die_chain
      arch/powerpc/kernel/traps.c:		powerpc_die_chain
      arch/sparc64/kernel/traps.c:		sparc64die_chain
      arch/x86_64/kernel/traps.c:		die_chain
      drivers/char/ipmi/ipmi_si_intf.c:	xaction_notifier_list
      kernel/panic.c:				panic_notifier_list
      kernel/profile.c:			task_free_notifier
      net/bluetooth/hci_core.c:		hci_notifier
      net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_conntrack_core.c:	ip_conntrack_chain
      net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_conntrack_core.c:	ip_conntrack_expect_chain
      net/ipv6/addrconf.c:			inet6addr_chain
      net/netfilter/nf_conntrack_core.c:	nf_conntrack_chain
      net/netfilter/nf_conntrack_core.c:	nf_conntrack_expect_chain
      net/netlink/af_netlink.c:		netlink_chain
      
        BLOCKING CHAINS
        ---------------
      arch/powerpc/platforms/pseries/reconfig.c:	pSeries_reconfig_chain
      arch/s390/kernel/process.c:		idle_chain
      arch/x86_64/kernel/process.c		idle_notifier
      drivers/base/memory.c:			memory_chain
      drivers/cpufreq/cpufreq.c		cpufreq_policy_notifier_list
      drivers/cpufreq/cpufreq.c		cpufreq_transition_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/adb.c:		adb_client_list
      drivers/macintosh/via-pmu.c		sleep_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/via-pmu68k.c		sleep_notifier_list
      drivers/macintosh/windfarm_core.c	wf_client_list
      drivers/usb/core/notify.c		usb_notifier_list
      drivers/video/fbmem.c			fb_notifier_list
      kernel/cpu.c				cpu_chain
      kernel/module.c				module_notify_list
      kernel/profile.c			munmap_notifier
      kernel/profile.c			task_exit_notifier
      kernel/sys.c				reboot_notifier_list
      net/core/dev.c				netdev_chain
      net/decnet/dn_dev.c:			dnaddr_chain
      net/ipv4/devinet.c:			inetaddr_chain
      
      It's possible that some of these classifications are wrong.  If they are,
      please let us know or submit a patch to fix them.  Note that any chain that
      gets called very frequently should be atomic, because the rwsem read-locking
      used for blocking chains is very likely to incur cache misses on SMP systems.
      (However, if the chain's callout routines may sleep then the chain cannot be
      atomic.)
      
      The patch set was written by Alan Stern and Chandra Seetharaman, incorporating
      material written by Keith Owens and suggestions from Paul McKenney and Andrew
      Morton.
      
      [jes@sgi.com: restructure the notifier chain initialization macros]
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAlan Stern <stern@rowland.harvard.edu>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarChandra Seetharaman <sekharan@us.ibm.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJes Sorensen <jes@sgi.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      e041c683
  14. 26 Mar, 2006 2 commits
  15. 24 Mar, 2006 4 commits
  16. 23 Mar, 2006 1 commit
    • Andrew Morton's avatar
      [PATCH] more for_each_cpu() conversions · 394e3902
      Andrew Morton authored
      
      
      When we stop allocating percpu memory for not-possible CPUs we must not touch
      the percpu data for not-possible CPUs at all.  The correct way of doing this
      is to test cpu_possible() or to use for_each_cpu().
      
      This patch is a kernel-wide sweep of all instances of NR_CPUS.  I found very
      few instances of this bug, if any.  But the patch converts lots of open-coded
      test to use the preferred helper macros.
      
      Cc: Mikael Starvik <starvik@axis.com>
      Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Acked-by: default avatarKyle McMartin <kyle@parisc-linux.org>
      Cc: Anton Blanchard <anton@samba.org>
      Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
      Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
      Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
      Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
      Cc: Paul Mundt <lethal@linux-sh.org>
      Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
      Cc: William Lee Irwin III <wli@holomorphy.com>
      Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@muc.de>
      Cc: Christian Zankel <chris@zankel.net>
      Cc: Philippe Elie <phil.el@wanadoo.fr>
      Cc: Nathan Scott <nathans@sgi.com>
      Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@suse.de>
      Cc: Eric Dumazet <dada1@cosmosbay.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      394e3902
  17. 24 Feb, 2006 1 commit
    • Ulrich Drepper's avatar
      [PATCH] flags parameter for linkat · c04030e1
      Ulrich Drepper authored
      
      
      I'm currently at the POSIX meeting and one thing covered was the
      incompatibility of Linux's link() with the POSIX definition.  The name.
      Linux does not follow symlinks, POSIX requires it does.
      
      Even if somebody thinks this is a good default behavior we cannot change this
      because it would break the ABI.  But the fact remains that some application
      might want this behavior.
      
      We have one chance to help implementing this without breaking the behavior.
       For this we could use the new linkat interface which would need a new
      flags parameter.  If the new parameter is AT_SYMLINK_FOLLOW the new
      behavior could be invoked.
      
      I do not want to introduce such a patch now.  But we could add the
      parameter now, just don't use it.  The patch below would do this.  Can we
      get this late patch applied before the release more or less fixes the
      syscall API?
      Signed-off-by: default avatarUlrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarRalf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org>
      Cc: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
      Cc: Martin Schwidefsky <schwidefsky@de.ibm.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      c04030e1
  18. 17 Feb, 2006 5 commits
  19. 12 Feb, 2006 2 commits